The Golden Beverage – With a Twist

Golden beverage in a mug

I just threw some ingredients together last morning to prepare my morning beverage. Actually, there was a reason that sparked my creativity. My youngest was feeling a little iffy and seemed to be struggling with a mild congestion & slight cough for two days. He insisted on having his yellow milk before school yesterday. I obliged.

There is something really therapeutic about rubbing fresh turmeric root on a grinding stone. My little grinding stone was in a moving box and I didn’t have the heart to rub turmeric root in my white ceramic mortar & pestle.

I digress.

After my son left, I was left thinking of the bug doing its rounds, other more serious bugs also lurking about. I paid thought to my child’s intuitive reach to the herb that comforted and soothed his boo boo.

But my beverage was not as innocent as his. I threw in some other ingredients – my mind & thoughts working simultaneously with Ayurveda one one side, my needs and wants on the other.

What did I want last morning? What did I need?

I wanted creamy richness. I wanted to soothe myself for self-care. Yet, I wanted the familiarity of coffee or tea. I wanted a mouth full of flavor reminiscent of home. I needed a deeply satisfying sense of tethering & grounding as I was settling down to swadhyaya and then some goal setting. I needed to stay the course. I needed comfort. I also needed to have my immune reserves in top notch condition.

The weather was shifting. The past few days had been unprecedentedly hot for mid February in Bangalore and the viral fevers were testimony to an erratic Vata period.

I put together my Golden Beverage with a twist.

The twist included a small shot of organic filter coffee. A bit of a stimulant, coffee, but my small shot was my teensie sin to the potion. Any aggravated Vata would be taken care of by my next ingredient.

It also involved thick, whisked coconut milk. I whisked it with some virgin cold pressed coconut oil. Now, you can take the girl out of Mangalore, but never the coastal goodness out of her! Everything about coconut screams home, nourishment, nurturing, stability, goodness, mama, and delicious flavor! This is the creamer I wanted. Coconut is a great balancer for Vata & Pitta and I was careful not to overdose on it, so my Kapha was well looked after. To keep the beverage warm, I placed the whisked coconut milk in a bowl of boiling water so it would be warm.

I didn’t have vanilla pods – vanilla brings out the coconut better, I hear, but I’m not a vanilla person… so I sprinkled in a dash of cinnamon & nutmeg both are wonderfully grounding balancers of Vata & Kapha.

To assemble, I put in a few pieces of palm jaggery powder in my mug and a whole tsp of ground turmeric.

Palm jaggery is special because my earliest memories of visits to Mangalore involved ‘godachi kaapi‘ – jaggery coffee. This jaggery is a great mineral resource – rich in Iron, Magnesium and B vitamins.

And, well, the tridoshic turmeric needs absolutely no intro.

Put them all together and sit in the quiet of a house after the morning ‘off to school’ rush – the beverage is a soothing treat to the senses – relief & respite.

 

 

The Ayurveda of Ash Gourd Stew

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Ash gourd stew served over steaming rice

A few months ago I shared The Carrot Halwa Insight after a random mood to make the dessert to surprise the kids! My penchant for all things Mangalorean is still strong. Our dinner frequently includes coastal recipes and last evening was no different. We had a simple dinner of ash gourd stew with rice.

Firstly, I love ash gourd. I love it as a raw raita, or ash gourd juice, as Agra ka petha or with prawns. I just love the delicate flesh of the gourd that melts in the mouth and leaves you with the gentle and light taste of freshness. But beyond the taste, there are so many more reasons to love it.

Ash gourd also known as ash pumpkin or Winter melon is so called because of the ash-like waxy coating on it’s skin. It is easily digested, has a cooling effect on the body and hence great for acid reflux or other inflammatory GI conditions. It is used extensively in preparing various Ayurvedic remedies.

One of the coolest things (pun intended) is that it is one of the vegetables of highest prana (superfood for yogis!) and is a wonderful addition to those convalescing from illness.

Some folk tales often told of prana being offered to Brahmins in exchange for priestly work. Even today, you’ll see many temple offerings and sacrifices involve ash pumpkins. A side story involved Brahmins actually ensuring that this high prana (and high brain power inducing vegetable) came only to them (controversy alert!) Anyway, today, the ash gourd is available to all, at least in India. It is also a vegetable that can last for a very, very long time.

In winters, it is best consumed as stew as it balances Pitta but more importantly Vata (something we need in winters) and better had for dinner, being Pitta and later Vata times of the day.

Now, for my Mama’s stew recipe – it is super simple!

  • Cook diced ash gourd along with finely sliced onions in 2 cups of thin coconut milk.
  • Add some salt, stew mix (turmeric, Kashmir chili, cumin, coriander, cinnamon stick, cloves, ginger, asafoetida all ground together).
  • When it is almost cooked, add 1 cup of thick coconut milk.
  • Temper with mustard seeds and curry leaves in coconut oil.
  • I sometimes stir in a little bit of kasuri methi.

The reason this stew is such awesome winter dish has got loads to do with the lovely blend of spices – the crown jewels of Ayurvedic cooking! The lightness and simplicity of the gourd along the grounding kapha nourishment of coconut milk and their combined effort to balance vata & pitta… omg! I think I feel some cravings rising already!

And when you use all your senses, a dish of that simple pale red/orange color starkly contrasting against the white steamed rice – the fragrance of the herbs and spices – your digestive agni is definitely stoked & ready to tuck into this wholesome loveliness!

To me, this stew is a reminder of home – of my mother and grandmother and their kitchen of nurturing warmth and nourishment. It makes me feel loved with their tenderness of serving with love and care. I connects me with my culture, the smell of earth and raw goodness. It tastes of love and reminds me of who I am and where I come from and that I belong.

Workplace Wellness Series #2: 7 Foods to Tackle Stress

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Photo by Trang Doan from Pexels

Stress is that one buzzword that simply keeps coming up in everyday life – at work, at home, at school, in traffic…. or even at birthday parties and gyms! Not all stress is bad news, some of it is good stress too – in fact, stress is a necessary part of life and all the decisions that we take to exist and thrive. However, in the most colloquial sense, stress is defined as the degree to which one feels overwhelmed or unable to cope as a result of unmanageable pressures.

Although there are many ways in which stress can be managed, food and nutrition can play a very important role. Eating healthy and on time is a good start, but every now & then when those deadlines begin to loom and the pressure begins to mount, our food often takes a back seat. Fluctuating blood sugars affect our mood as well as our emotional response. This in turn, sadly, starts to cause strain in interpersonal relationships and energy drain.

Here are my top 7 stress buster foods that can help to manage just those down days and some ideas on how to incorporate them into your plan as well:

Oatmeal: Carbohydrates are not just an important source of energy, they also are a great source of serotonin, a neurotransmitter extremely important for regulating mood and feelings of happiness and wellness. Simple carbohydrates from sugary cereal bars and cookies can cause a unwanted spikes and drops in blood sugar. Instead, a complex carb like oatmeal is a good way to get the serotonin and at the same time go easy on the blood sugar.

Berries: These gorgeously colorful fruits are rich in antioxidants and flavonoids. While antioxidants help in fighting the stress effects of free radicals, flavonoids have been shown to improve cognitive function and reduce depressive tendencies and improve mood. Blueberries have been shown to increase natural killer cells that are vital in immunity and critical for stress defense. Raspberries, red currants, grapes, blackberries, strawberries (watch out of pesticide levels). The Indian seasonal berries are even better, jamuns(Indian blackberry), amla (Indian gooseberry), shahtoot (Indian mulberry) are a better option to keep your diet fresh and local (for my Indian audience).

Green leafy vegetables: Yes! You can’t get through many healthy lists without this group! In this list, it’s the folate, a water soluble B vitamin, that is required for healthy cell growth and metabolism and is necessary for the proper biosynthesis of dopamine and other neurotransmitters. Dopamine is a pleasure-inducing neurotransmitter and a mood regulator. If you want to keep your mood and stress levels in a good place, make sure you get your daily servings of green leafies. Throw in some baby spinach into a sandwich or salad and you’re done! No cooking even!

Nuts & Seeds: Power packed with nutrients, calories, good fats and stress-busting goodness. There are so many reasons to have these handy babies around – better still mix them together with some dried fruits for your own trail mix. Nuts like cashews are super rich in Zinc as well as Iron, Magnesium and Vitamin B6 and many other minerals that support the nervous system as well as influence mood. An interesting nut to add is the elegant pistachio. Research has shown that the snapping sound along with the repetitive action of working the pistachios has a calming effect on fraying nerves. They’re also rich in phytonutrients that support cardiovascular health. Seeds like flaxseed, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds are another good source of omega 3s, especially for vegetarians, and can help to alleviate depression, fatigue, irritability as well as symptoms of PMS.

Bananas: My mother will particularly be pleased with this entry, bananas being her favorite fruit. Maybe that’s why she’s one of the calmest people I know! 🙂 Bananas are not just rich in Potassium, they’re also a great source of Vitamin B6 which help in optimizing nervous function and decrease stress effects and fatigue. Better news still is that bananas are a good source of serotonin – that feel good & mood elevator.

Protein: Now I know this is a macronutrient and not necessarily a food, but proteins like poultry, fish, cheeses, tofu, lentils, beans and eggs all contain an essential amino acid, essential in the creation of serotonin in the body.

And finally….

Chocolate: I had to save the best for the last! Eating 40 gm of dark chocolate (at least 70% cocoa) has been shown to reduce stress by lowering cortisol and epinephrine levels – both notorious stress hormones. Antioxidants in the chocolate have been shown to relax the walls of blood vessels and lower blood pressure as well as improve circulation. Serotonin and other compounds in chocolate show an improvement in PMS symptoms. Lastly, the presence of anandamide (named after the Sanskrit term, ‘ananda‘ meaning ‘bliss’), a neurotransmitter that creates a sense of euphoria and bliss – similar to the feeling of being in love.

First published on LinkedIn here.

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